engineering
energy concepts | Smart energy | What will our energy supply look like in the future? This is a difficult question for which there is no clear-cut answer. But we can describe alternative developments. In our third scenario, competition has been taken to extremes. In this all-embracing rivalry everyone is focused on their own interests – and the energy sector is no exception.
engineering
energy concepts | Smart energy | What will our energy supply look like in the future? This is a difficult question for which there is no clear-cut answer. But we can describe alternative developments - that's exactly what we're doing with our Foresight series. In our second scenario, the world's energy system is under central control – however, the electricity does not come from renewable energies but from highly developed coal-fired power plants. The effects of climate change are very unevenly distributed in this alternative future and are accepted by the majority of people.
engineering
energy concepts | Smart energy | What will our energy supply look like in the future? This is a difficult question for which there is no clear-cut answer. But we can describe alternative developments - that's exactly what we're doing with our Foresight series. In our first scenario, the world has become a place fit for everyone – thanks to a shared social vision of the future, political common sense, and purposefully pursued innovations. Collaboration has taken the place of competition.
engineering
energy concepts | innovation | Smart energy | Sustainability and climate protection | In order to achieve the Paris Agreement climate targets, we must significantly increase the share of renewable energies. By 2030, for example, 65 percent of our gross electricity consumption is to come from renewable energies – today this figure is only 37.8 percent. So there are still a few challenges to overcome before we can look back with pride on a successful energy turnaround. These three technologies could help us close the impending supply gap.
engineering
energy concepts | future of production | Sustainability and climate protection | To make steel production more sustainable, thyssenkrupp is already working on promising hydrogen-based technologies. Because the production of hydrogen requires a lot of electricity, the expansion of renewable energies is a decisive factor for large-scale industrial implementation. During her visit to our Duisburg steel site, Germany’s Federal Research Minister Anja Karliczek pointed out that this challenge could only be met by working together. She was impressed by thyssenkrupp’s two-pillar strategy for green steel.