A glimpse into the future: Girls’ Day at thyssenkrupp in Egypt

Career at thyssenkrupp | thyssenkrupp worldwide | Knowing what you want to do after graduation is not always easy. It is equally difficult to find the right start. For this reason, thyssenkrupp's Egypt business has decided, as part of the ProGirls initiative, to give pupils an exclusive insight into their future dream professions.

From human resources to sales and accounting, the students’ interests are diverse. But how do you become a sales engineer and what exactly are the employees doing in the Human Resources department? Five pupils from the area around Cairo and Alexandria asked the industrial solutions experts of thyssenkrupp these and many other questions.

What career do you fancy most? At GirlsDay in Egypt, thyssenkrupp asked five schoolgirls exactly this question – and gave the young talents their first practical insights into the world of work

What career do you fancy most? At GirlsDay in Egypt, thyssenkrupp asked five schoolgirls exactly this question – and gave the young talents their first practical insights into the world of work

It is the first time that the students get a practical insight into the world of work. The experiences and insights should help them to get a better idea of what they would like to do later. “It is a great advantage for the school girls to get an insight into their chosen profession,” says Thore Lohmann, CEO of thyssenkrupp Industrial Solutions in Egypt. “The experience and exchange can help them decide and explore what they want to become in the future. The more they see and learn, the better they can make their decision later.”

Not only the pupils benefit from the exchange

For one day, the thyssenkrupp employees answer the girls’ questions. They give practical and exciting insights into their professional field – but also into their personal careers. “If you want to become a sales engineer, you not only need technical knowledge but also know-how in business administration,” explains Ahmed Khaled, Sales Project Manager at thyssenkrupp Industrial Solutions to the attendees. “But that’s not all. You also need financial knowledge, communication skills and an interest in marketing in your day-to-day work.” For the students, this is an important hint, because at the age of 16 they can decide at school which subjects they would like to deepen in the future. These will then prepare them optimally for their future university studies.

At GirlsDay, the students had the unique opportunity to ask experienced colleagues from thyssenkrupp their individual questions about their work as well as the most important skills - and, of course, what makes their jobs so exciting

At GirlsDay, the students had the unique opportunity to ask experienced colleagues from thyssenkrupp their individual questions about their work as well as the most important skills – and, of course, what makes their jobs so exciting

But the pupils received not only a theoretical insight but also dealt with practical tasks prepared by the employees. This provided a direct insight into the tasks of their dream job. However, not only the pupils benefit from thyssenkrupp’s commitment, as Thore Lohmann, who is the father of two daughters, notes: “Of course we as a company also benefit from the joint cooperation. By participating in the program, we will become better mentors on the one hand, but on the other hand, we will also get in touch with young talents at an early stage who we might be able to recruit for thyssenkrupp later on. This will, of course, have a positive effect on the company in the future.”

Only one fifth of the employees in the region are women

The ProGirls initiative is a joint project of EconoWin, the “Schools Partners for the Future Initiative” (“Pasch”) and the Goethe-Institut Cairo and Alexandria. The aim of the cooperation with thyssenkrupp and other industrial partners is to give the students career guidance with a focus on STEM (science technology, engineering and mathematics) and management positions.

The high-tech industrial plants of thyssenkrupp in Port Said, Egypt, produce polypropylene – one of the world's most widely used plastics

The high-tech industrial plants of thyssenkrupp in Port Said, Egypt, produce polypropylene – one of the world’s most widely used plastics

The promotion of female talent is a particularly important task in the region. In global comparison, the proportion of female employees in North Africa and the Middle East is still the lowest: Only about one-fifth of employees are women. The so-called STEM subjects and management positions, in particular, continue to be staffed by a large number of men. And this although the proportion of women graduating from STEM is almost as high as the proportion of men in the Arab world. Traditional role models, prejudices and poor wages still prevent women from pursuing a career in these areas. To work against these prejudices, thyssenkrupp is participating in the Pro Girls Initiative for the third time now, bringing young women one-step closer to their dream profession.

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